Dec. 20 Day 5 Solemn Christmas Novena– O Clavis David-O Key of David


The fourth of seven Great “O” Antiphons of the liturgy, that date back to the seventh or eighth century. These antiphons are chanted or recited at Vespers, or Evening Prayer, the Antiphon before the Magnificat. They are also the Alleluia verse at the Mass.

December 20

O CLAVIS DAVID KEY OF DAVID O Key of David, Scepter of the House of Israel, controlling at your will the gate of Heaven who opens and no man shuts, who shuts and no man opens
R :Come, and bring forth the captive from his prison, he who sits in darkness and in the shadow of death. Isaiah 22:22. Symbols: key; broken chains

Benedictine monks arranged these antiphons with a definite purpose. If one starts with the last title and takes the first letter of each one — Emmanuel, Rex, Oriens, Clavis, Radix, Adonai, Sapientia — the Latin words ero cras are formed, meaning, “Tomorrow, I will come.” In these words, the Lord Jesus, for whose coming we prepare in Advent and to whom we address these seven Messianic titles, now speaks to us. The O Antiphons not only bring intensity to our Advent preparations, but they bring our preparations to a joyful conclusion. Each antiphon begins with “O” and include a different Scriptural image through the Old Testament, all imploring the Messiah to come. As Elsa Chaney in Twelve Days of Christmas states, “They seem to sum up all our Advent longing as they paint in vivid terms the wretched condition of mankind and his need of a Savior.”

May the God of peace sanctify us completely and may our spirits souls and bodies be preserved blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ!

Try to spend five minutes in daily prayer and contemplation to better recognize the Christ Child and more fully receive His boundless blessings.

Click the link for the full text of prayers to Pray the Solemn Christmas Novena based on the Seven Great O Antiphons.

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Dec.19- Day 4 Solemn Christmas Novena– O Root of Jesse


The third of seven Great “O” Antiphons of the liturgy, that date back to the seventh or eighth century. These antiphons are chanted or recited at Vespers, or Evening Prayer, the Antiphon before the Magnificat. They are also the Alleluia verse at the Mass.

December 19

O flower of Jesse’s stem you have been raised up as a sign for all peoples and stand as a banner of the people, before whom kings shall keep silence and unto whom the Gentiles shall make supplication:
R: Come to deliver us, and tarry not let nothing keep you from coming to our aid!
Isaiah 11:1-3,10 Symbol: vine or plant in flower, especially a rose.


Benedictine monks arranged these antiphons with a definite purpose. If one starts with the last title and takes the first letter of each one — Emmanuel, Rex, Oriens, Clavis, Radix, Adonai, Sapientia — the Latin words ero cras are formed, meaning, “Tomorrow, I will come.” In these words, the Lord Jesus, for whose coming we prepare in Advent and to whom we address these seven Messianic titles, now speaks to us. The O Antiphons not only bring intensity to our Advent preparations, but they bring our preparations to a joyful conclusion. Each antiphon begins with “O” and include a different Scriptural image through the Old Testament, all imploring the Messiah to come. As Elsa Chaney in Twelve Days of Christmas states, “They seem to sum up all our Advent longing as they paint in vivid terms the wretched condition of mankind and his need of a Savior.”

May the God of peace sanctify us completely and may our spirits souls and bodies be preserved blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ!

Try to spend five minutes in daily prayer and contemplation to better recognize the Christ Child and more fully receive His boundless blessings.

Click the link for the full text of prayers to Pray the Solemn Christmas Novena based on the Seven Great O Antiphons.

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Day 3 Solemn Christmas Novena December 18th


The second of seven Great “O” Antiphons of the liturgy, that date back to the seventh or eighth century. These antiphons are chanted or recited at Vespers, or Evening Prayer, the Antiphon before the Magnificat. They are also the Alleluia verse at the Mass.

December 18

O ADONAI O LORD AND RULER

O Sacred Lord of the House of Israel, who appeared to Moses in the flame of the burning bush and gave him the law on Sinai:
R: Come, and redeem us with outstretched arm of your mighty hand.
Exodus 3:2, 20:1. Symbols: burning bush, stone tablets.

Benedictine monks arranged these antiphons with a definite purpose. If one starts with the last title and takes the first letter of each one — Emmanuel, Rex, Oriens, Clavis, Radix, Adonai, Sapientia — the Latin words ero cras are formed, meaning, “Tomorrow, I will come.” In these words, the Lord Jesus, for whose coming we prepare in Advent and to whom we address these seven Messianic titles, now speaks to us. The O Antiphons not only bring intensity to our Advent preparations, but they bring our preparations to a joyful conclusion. Each antiphon begins with “O” and include a different Scriptural image through the Old Testament, all imploring the Messiah to come. As Elsa Chaney in Twelve Days of Christmas states, “They seem to sum up all our Advent longing as they paint in vivid terms the wretched condition of mankind and his need of a Savior.”

May the God of peace sanctify us completely and may our spirits souls and bodies be preserved blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ!

Try to spend five minutes in daily prayer and contemplation to better recognize the Christ Child and more fully receive His boundless blessings.

Click the link for the full text of prayers to Pray the Solemn Christmas Novena based on the Seven Great O Antiphons.
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Day 2 Solemn Christmas Novena, December 17th


December 17 
The Church begins the seven Great “O” Antiphons of the liturgy, that date back to the seventh or eighth century. These antiphons are chanted or recited at Vespers, or Evening Prayer, the Antiphon before the Magnificat. They are also the Alleluia verse at the Mass.

 O SAPIENTIA  O WISDOM,   Holy Word of God who came from the mouth of the Most High, reaching from end to end and ordering all things mightily and sweetly with your strong and tender care    
R: Come, and teach us the way of prudence
Sirach 24:2; Wisdom 8:1. 
Symbols: oil lamp, open book.

Benedictine monks arranged these antiphons with a definite purpose. If one starts with the last title and takes the first letter of each one — Emmanuel, Rex, Oriens, Clavis, Radix, Adonai, Sapientia — the Latin words ero cras are formed, meaning, “Tomorrow, I will come.” In these words, the Lord Jesus, for whose coming we prepare in Advent and to whom we address these seven Messianic titles, now speaks to us. The O Antiphons not only bring intensity to our Advent preparations, but they bring our preparations to a joyful conclusion. Each antiphon begins with “O” and include a different Scriptural image through the Old Testament, all imploring the Messiah to come. As Elsa Chaney in Twelve Days of Christmas states, “They seem to sum up all our Advent longing as they paint in vivid terms the wretched condition of mankind and his need of a Savior.”

May the God of peace sanctify us completely and may our spirits souls and bodies be preserved blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ!

Try to spend five  minutes in daily prayer and contemplation to better recognize the Christ Child and more fully receive His boundless blessings. 

Click the link for the full text of prayers to Pray the Solemn Christmas Novena  based on the Seven Great O Antiphons.

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Solemn Christmas Novena, Day 1 December 16th


First Day of the Solemn Christmas Novena

Try to spend five  minutes in daily prayer and contemplation to better recognize the Christ Child and more fully receive His boundless blessings.  Click the link for the full text of prayers to Pray the Solemn Christmas Novena  based on the Seven Great O Antiphons.

December 16th
2b6dMoses

BEHOLD THE KING  The Lord of the earth who appeared to Moses in the flame of the burning bush and gave him the law on Sinai He  is drawing near! He will come and remove from us the Yoke of  our captivity of the House of Israel, and redeem us with outstretched arm.  

R: O Come, Let us adore Him!

Tomorrow, December 17th, the Church begins the seven Great “O” Antiphons of the liturgy, that date back to the seventh or eighth century. These antiphons are chanted or recited at Vespers, or Evening Prayer, the Antiphon before the Magnificat. They are also the Alleluia verse at the Mass.

Benedictine monks arranged these antiphons with a definite purpose. If one starts with the last title and takes the first letter of each one — Emmanuel, Rex, Oriens, Clavis, Radix, Adonai, Sapientia — the Latin words ero cras are formed, meaning, “Tomorrow, I will come.” In these words, the Lord Jesus, for whose coming we prepare in Advent and to whom we address these seven Messianic titles, now speaks to us. The O Antiphons not only bring intensity to our Advent preparations, but they bring our preparations to a joyful conclusion. Each antiphon begins with “O” and include a different Scriptural image through the Old Testament, all imploring the Messiah to come. As Elsa Chaney in Twelve Days of Christmas states, “They seem to sum up all our Advent longing as they paint in vivid terms the wretched condition of mankind and his need of a Savior.”

May the God of peace sanctify us completely and may our spirits souls and bodies be preserved blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ!
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St. Juan Diego; “I am a small rope, a tiny ladder, the tail end, a leaf ”


Juan2Yesterday after admiring the beauties of Our Lady as we celebrated the Solemnity  of the Immaculate Conception.  We recalled her great humility during her life when she spoke the words; “Behold,  the handmaid of the Lord let it be done to me!”

It is only fitting that the church inspired by God  to place before us on the day after this great solemnity another  example of humility one of the most humble if not the humblest of the saints for us to imitate, St. Juan Diego.  What purity and innocence is reflected in this most pure and simple man  so beloved God and by our Lady.

Today’s society is so filled with the  “I” word.   Men  are filled with themselves and say in contrast to the humility of Our Lady and the saints:  “Behold, see what I can do,” or, Behold, look everyone  what I have accomplished.  Men want to shine in their own false illusions of what is great! A far cry from the humility of Our Lady and St Juan Diego.   

We celebrate his feast today because God choose this saint for our times to become a model us modern men.  The saints teach us where true greatness can be found in lving service of God and the recognition of our nothingness without Him.  We must turn to the saints for lessons to imitate in order to practice and to live a life of humility. 

Childlike humility is a condition given by Our Lord for entrance into the kingdom.  “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.  The Servant of God Fr. John Anthony Hardon,S.J.  often remarked  in his talks that; “Only the very humble  and very chaste can enter the kingdom of Heaven no one else, no one else no one else!” 

St. Juan Diego You who once told our Lady:  “ I am a nobody, I am a small rope, a tiny ladder, the tail end, a leaf ”

Pray for us Juan Diego  that we may obtain true humility of heart for only the very humble and very chaste will be small enough to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Read more: St Juan Diego Model of Humility

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Miracle of Holy Mass and Purgatory in 1657


 Miracle of Holy Mass and Purgatory in 1657    

Shrine of Our Lady of Montserrat

 An apparition from Purgatory

Copy of monstrantte

Montserrat - the site of a Marian shrine – is a thousand year old  Benedictine monastery. The shrine is set on the ledge of the mountains. The Basilica was constructed in the neo-Gothic and Renaissance style and was consecrated in 1592, 100 years after the discovery of America. 

 

 220px-Statue-Madonna-von-Montserrat

According to legend, the statue of Our Lady of Montserrat was discovered by young shepherds who had been attracted by lights that came from a cave where the statute was hidden. Our Lady of Montserrat is the Patroness of Catalonia, and because of the color of her skin, she is known as “La Moreneta” (“The Little Black Madonna”).

 

 

In 1657 the Most Reverend Father Bernardo de Ontevieros, General of the Benedictine Order in Spain, along with the Abbot Father Millán de Mirando, were present at the monstery of Our Lady of Montserrat to take part in several conferences when a woman with her young daughter came to the monastery, and the little girl began to implore Abbot Millán to celebrate three Masses in memory of her deceased father, deeply convinced that by the merits of these Masses, the soul of her father would be freed from the pains of Purgatory.  The good Abbot, moved by the tears of the young girl, began to celebrate the first of these Masses for the dead on the following day, and the little girl, who was present at the Mass with her mother, during the consecration began to declare that she saw her father kneeling at the foot of the main altar, surrounded by dreadful flames. The Father General, who was skeptical, wishing to determine whether the little girl’s account was true, told her to bring a handkerchief close to the flames that surrounded her father. The little girl, following his directive, placed the handkerchief in that mysterious fire which only she was able to see, and at once all the monks saw the handkerchief catch fire with a living flame. …..Read More

Also see: The Fatima Message confirms reality of Purgatory

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